Starting in 1930 to mid 1940 I would like to mention how we spent our child hood the following are a few of the games we played. tors or marbles could be played with two or more players, it was a simple but enjoyable game, and entailed a player in turn had to try to hit any of the opponents marble and if successful would then be able to claim that marble as his own and build up his own stock, I remember that I would play most of the dinner time break, arriving home to have only ten minutes for my dinner, much to the Roth of my mother, we used to have an hour and half for dinner from school in those days and most pupils went home to dinner as we lived with-in easy walking distance of our school.    . Another game we played was french gricket, which was played with one lad being the baller and the other one holding the bat in front of His legs,his legs having to be together and not to move, the baller would be about Twenty feet away and would try to hit the batsmans legs, when the Batsman Managed to hit the ball he had to get as many runs has a could befor the baller hit him with the ball. When the Baller managed to hit the batsmans legs they then changed places, then at the end of the game the player added up their runs to see who was the winner, By the way this game was played with a Tennis ball and not a hard cricket ball.         The following are the Rules for french cricket taken from the internet.—————-

           

How to play:

The players stand in a circle, and somebody is chosen to bat first. He stands with his feet together, defending the “stumps”, which are his legs below the knees. The players in the circle bowl at the stumps and he must hit the ball away. If he hits the ball, and only if he hits the ball, he can move his feet and turn around to face in another direction. If he doesn’t hit the ball, he must twist and turn to try to defend the stumps without moving his feet. He can also be “caught out”, if he hits the ball and one of the players in the circle catches it before it bounces. You can get yourself into quite a pickle if you are trying to defend your stumps against a player who is bowling at you from behind!

When he is “out”, he is usually replaced by the player who bowled him or caught him out. If the game is very unequal, you might step in and make sure that everybody takes it in turns to bat instead. There were of course lots of other games which are hard to discribe, such as Hide and Seek which because we lived on a farm, ther were plenty of places to hide and it could take the seeker a long time to find every one. we also played Hide and Seek in the winter when it was dark and we used to play by the light of the street gas lighting, but the Hiders wern’t allowed to go out of the range of the light from the Gas lamp, of course the game had to stop when the war started becuase the street lights wern’t allowed to be lit because of the Black out. Other games were Hoop-la, Piggy, hope scotch and many more.

 

John Carter Stott – July 2004
This article brought back happy memories for me when at the age of fourteen I was in a ploughing match at a farm which was owned by a farmer named Ian Grant. The farm was at Farsley near Bradford, which is now mostly housing and has been built on. At the ploughing match I had a pair of half legged bays – so called because they were usually half bred Clydesdale with not much feather (or hair) on their legs. The plough that I used was named a COOK plough which had a long mould board. At the Ploughing match, at which by the way I was representing Bradford Young Farmers club, I had no one to help me open out the first furrow, I had no lead man, and in spite of that I got a special prize, of which I was very proud. On looking back I think the prize would be for the youngest competitor, and not for any excellence, although at the time I felt I had made a reasonable

It was the summer of 1938. my holiday from school, four weeks to be spent in the fields, for a lad of Nine this was certainly the life. It was July and the Hay time was in full swing. Father and mother were up early in the day, the cows were brought up from the fields, one by one they would rise from where they had been Lying all night chewing their cud, and they would gradually appear through the early morning mist making their way to the gate, then up the narrow lane, which had high walls that were covered with Lichen and Moss and across the stone strewn lane, a stream gurgled through the wall, then disappeared beneath a great stone .on the opposite side of the lane. One by one the cows arrived at the farm buildings. Into the farm yard they would come their udders full of milk with the odd cow or two, milk beginning to stream from their teats. The cows first of all would make their way to a trough in the farm yard, where they would take their fill of water, what was remarkable was that in this trough were several fish which lived there, we had caught these fish quite a while ago in the local canal and placed them in the trough, they would now be about Six to eight inches long, they lived quite happily in there , even when the cows had almost emptied the trough, the fish would flick about until the trough was filled again. After the cows had their fill of water, they would then go into the mistal (cow shed) where they were tied up with a chain round the neck, their were two cows to a stall, with a passage in front running the full length of the mistal this passage was called a Fotheram, Perhaps this was originally named the Fodder them, because this is where the fodder was carried to the cattle when they were fed. Well the cows were now ready for milking, which was at that timed performed by hand, because milking machines, where virtually unknown in the north. The cows would be fed and then milked, Mother would do the feeding, carrying the milk, letting out the cows after milking washing down the Standings, finally washing up the dairy utensils. Father would do the milking, which would take about two hours to milk all the eighteen Shorthorn cattle. I can still remember the sound of the cattle being milked, first of all that would be fed a mixture of Brewers grain, rolled corn with Linseed cake, then father would take his milking pail and three legged stool, he would place the three legged stool on the floor with the single leg at the rear so as when the cow moved about he was able to rock side ways. My father would then sit with the milking pail between his legs, and the sound and rhythm of the milk going into the empty pail was like music to me, and as the pail began to fill up the sound went from a high note to a lower softer note, and a froth would build up on the milk, which some times when the pail was full the froth would be inches above the pail rim with out any milk running down the pail. Many is the time I would take a pint pot and let my father fill it by milking the warm milk straight into the pot, then I would drink this while still warm, this I enjoyed, and I loved the smell of fresh milk. After milking the cows were returned to the field down the same old lane. We would all go into Breakfast, which would consist of cornflakes, followed by Ham and Eggs also fried bread. After Breakfast the horses would be fetched from the field, and given a feed of Bran and Oats, after they had eaten they would have their harness; they would then be taken to the field and hitched to the grass cutter.

SEE HAYTIME IN THIS BLOG.

Memories from the Days of Steam Threshing

Courtesy of John Richmond of Ripon

Threshing days especially for smallholdings in the Dales was a time when neighbours came to “staff”the day which needed at least nine strong and willing workers.

The owner of the “Threshing Outfit” “provided the feederas shown in the Photo. standing lower in a small box-like trough next to the “band cutter” -a job that was an art in it self, made much easier by the careful action of the “forker”.If the “forker” again Shown in the Photo with a shave of corn in Mid air. If the forker failed to drop Shaves (sheaves) at the right angle for the band cutter to pick them up, there was soon some muttering from both characters atop the threshing machine, A few deft “band cutters” could pick up the “shav with a very sharp bladed Pocket knife aand in one action turn handing the contents of the sheave to the waiting arms of the feeder who let the eared corn drop drop smoothly into the fearsome drum—Hence he was “t’feeder”

Between the Steam Engine and Thresher was where the strongest young men assembled, where the corn appeared through slots into Hessian sacks, to be carried perhaps 50 or 60 yards up some stone granary steps to be emptied quickly floor and back at a very quick pace especially if it had been a very heavy crop

Some times in the case of wheat, the corn was to be bagged in in “Rail sacks” containing 16 stones in weight, what would health and safety officers of said?. At the other end of the Thresher was “T’Straw end” a dusty job as the straw was tied into “Battins” . Just as the binder out in the cornfield had a part of its wonderful mechanism a knotter and a tyer” (a miracle in it self) A similar double tying operation was on the Thresher. Either the straw was stacked close by or back into a part of the large Dutch Barn—-all this work done by hand. I must not forget…..Lads job was “cowlin’ caff” the chaff fell under the thresher and had to be kept clear, and so armed with a wooden Hay Rake, t’larl lad” raked as best he could, often into a corrugated small shed known as “t’caff-oile”, close by,as much as possible of the remnants.

A few further words of explanation. Threshing was a new venture in the Dales farming during the war when farmers were forced to plough out certain fields to grow corn to help with the war effort. most farmers would have only one days threshing, an exciting time for children like myself to hear the steam engine coming, often at least a mile away in semi- darkness

The head gear of the various individuals is yet another part of the story, it included the owner of the Thresher perched on the engine with the customary train drivers felt cap, which always had a liberal ammount of oil and grease set into the material. while the farmer near the steam engine had a better quality trilby than the workers on the stack!

Watching the adept manoeuvres of the driver of the steam engine in the flickering  lamplight of a stable lantern furnished me with a childlike determination that I one day, would drive a steam engine, which never came to fruition. I still attend steam rallies,just to get the smell and noise of those far away days.

Threshing time at a farm in Aberford Leeds in1936

By courtecy of the Yorkshire Post

ycrkshirepostco uk floor

I went for a walk with my daughter Patricia. We set of from Appletreewick at the top of the village,up a small lane and after a few yards we turned right across the fields, where thereare some of the most fascinating Stiles, one of the stiles is only just wide enough to allow one to squeeze through, and I wondered how the lambs were prevented from going through although the Ewes wouldn’t be able to get through.

Stile Appletreewick

Stile Appletreewick

After going through this Stile we went through a few fields and Stiles the meadows were full of Buttercups and looked lovely, a few years ago we wouldn’t have seen this scene asa lot of the farmers used weed killers which killed all broad leave plants but did not kill the grasses but we have now to thank the farmers for looking after the country side helped by certain subsides.

Buttercups in May

Buttercups in May

As we continued across the fields the farmer started rounding up his cows ready for the afternoon milking, it was a grand scene to watch, because the farmer was at the top of the hill 0n his Quad bike and he sent his Collie to fetch the cows from I should say about a quarter of a mile away, the dog did very well it quietly took the cows to-wards the farmer, but unfortunately it had missed one which was down near the Brook,any way the farmer sent it back to fetch the stray cow. The collie raced down the hill and quietly and persistently took the cow back to the rest of the herd up on the hill

Rounding up the Herd

Rounding up the Herd

Watching the farmer and his dog round up the cows really made my day, because it brought back happy memories of when I used to work with cattle and used to train dogs to work with cows, which can be more difficult to turn than sheep

AsI stood there with my daughter it took me back to my youth when in these same fields the hay was made by hand and was swept up to the barns where it was forked into the out barns (which are still there to-day) these out barns would perhaps have standings for perhaps halve a dozen milk cattle where the cows would be milked and the milk carried in what was called a Back can back to the village. I hope that you enjoy my reminiscing as-much as I have.

Tuesday, 12 June 2007
Bradford Young Farmers Club

Just a few lines about the Young Farmers Club that was formed in Bradford in 1943. It was initiated with members of the National Farmers union (Bradford Branch) Members who formed the basis and where named as the advisory committee, where the following names Herbert Stott my father, and his friend Fred Watson who farmed at Greengates, then there was Harold Greenwood , he farmed at Eccleshill. then there was Edgar Greenwood, Poplars Farm, Kings Road. At the first meeting where the sons & daughters of the advisory committee who formed the Basis of the club official positions such as Chairman, Secretary Treasurer and Committee members. After a few meetings the club soon grew to upwards of a hundred members and was drawn from Sons & Daughters of farmers & farm workers, besides these their were members outside the farming community who were interested in farming and rural affairs. The Advisory, committee appointed a leader who helped with the running of the club, his name was Kenneth Moss an accountant who eventually became the President of the Bradford and Bingley Building Society.Add Image
The Young Farmers Club Was run democratically and held a annual general meeting where the officials were voted in by the members, but the Leader had to be elected by the advisory committee. the young farmers would hold meetings about monthly, at one of these a yearly syllabus would be drawn up, arranging meetings to be held through out the year, in winter meeting were mostly held in doors, perhaps at certain schools, In summer we would go to different venue’s, such as farms and any thing to do with agriculture, e.g.such as St Ives Grass Land Research Station, Nr Bingley.- Dairy’s such as Northen Dairies.-Egg Packing Station at Driglington.-and many other places. We would also get coach trips organized and go to various places, such has the experimental Farm at Higher Mowlthorp,another coach trip could be to the Dairy Show or the Fat Stock show in London which could include the Moter show
On a lighter note a few relationships not to mention marriages where formed and looking back and to the present day, a lot of these marriages were stable marriages, and quite a few have been successful in farming concerns.
If any past members read this I wish them well, and hope that they can send me any comments on the Bradford Young Farmers Club
John

I will now try to recall what childhood was like in the 1930′s one of the first things I remember is of a man called uncle Tom who came from Leeds, when I would be just turned four years of age and I remember he made me a Go Cart (bogey) Which I used to take the cattle food in buckets to the cows. Because we had a farm I always had plenty of friends and we used to play hide and seek and play Dare, which meant that we would challenge our friends to follow our example, when we do such things as climbing onto buildings and walking on wall tops, I also remember challenging my friends to go under a horses belly, I was lucky because being brought up with animals I had no fear of them,all though we were always told to keep away from the Bull. At the age of five I was taken to School by my mother, this was the only time that I was escorted by mother, because we only lived perhaps 600 Yd’s away from the School. The head Mistress named Miss Boardman asked me if I wanted to go into the Babies or into form 1, because my cousin Barbara was in that form, I volunteered to go into that class, although I can remember feeling cheated, because I saw all the children having a lay down later in the day. the form I was in had its compensation though because their was a girl named Enid Jowettand as we were passing between the desks I can remember us having a kiss, I am vain enough to hope she remembers that incident. Being on a farm had alot of advantages , because you could have all your friends and what a place to play hide and seek and of coarse when it was Hay Time we were able to have a ride on the hay wagon down into the field when the load of hayhad been unloaded onto the Hay Stack, even though we had to walk back home.I recon that I was a lucky Lad, because when I was Nine years old, my father bought a second hand motor Wagon, it was a Chevorlet thirty hundred weight ( which meant the weight it could reasonably carry ) it cost my father eleven Pounds,and for that it had a canopy built over the cab so that it would be able to carry more hay or corn, whyI say that I was lucky was because I learnt to drive that vehicle shortly after my father bought it. What happened was that I had watched my father drive the motor Wagon, and one day when he had taken a load of hay of and he had gone in for his dinner climbed into the cab switched on the ignition, then pressed the starter button which was on the floor and low and behold the engine started, I couldn’t reach the clutch and brake sat on the seat, so I had to stand up, any way I managed to turn the motor wagon round ready for my father to go for another load of hay. So having proved my self compitant it was my job after school to drive the motor wagon in the field while every one loaded the hay, ( what a young life I had) Things I remember most.—Hens with chickens in the farm yard—Two young Kids which must have been a nusance, but I loved to watch them caper across the roof tops.—My first Pet which was a two month old sheep dog pup which had been given to me by my Dad and he had got from Harry Morphet who farmed at Huby, and was a close friend of my Dads, I named the Pup Judy, not a good name for a sheep dog —- Having my own Hiefer calf —- Playing whip and top —- playing at marbles —- Rolling Gas Tar —- Playing at Conkers —- Walking on wall tops —-climbing trees —- Riding my second hand bike of which I was very proud —- My Train set —- new suit at Whitsontide —- Bonfire night —- Holidays with my Grand Parents at Appletreewick in Wharfedale —-These are just a few of my memories as I could write a book.

John Carter Stott – July 2004
This article brought back happy memories for me when at the age of fourteen I was in a ploughing match at a farm which was owned by a farmer named Ian Grant. The farm was at Farsley near Bradford, which is now mostly housing and has been built on. At the ploughing match I had a pair of half legged bays – so called because they were usually half bred Clydesdale with not much feather (or hair) on their legs. The plough that I used was named a COOK plough which had a long mould board. At the Ploughing match, at which by the way I was representing Bradford Young Farmers club, I had no one to help me open out the first furrow, I had no lead man, and in spite of that I got a special prize, of which I was very proud. On looking back I think the prize would be for the youngest competitor, and not for any excellence, although at the time I felt I had made a reasonablejob.

Favourite verse

The sun had set behind yon hills,
Across yon dreary moor,
Weary and lame, a boy there came
Up to a farmer’s door:
‘Can you tell me if any there be
That will give me employ,
To plow and sow, and reap and mow,
And be a farmer’s boy?

A Farmers Lad

It was the summer of 1938. my holiday from school, four weeks to be spent in the fields, for a lad of Nine this was certainly the life. It was July and the Hay time was in full swing. Father and mother were up early in the day, the cows were brought up from the fields, one by one they would rise from where they had been Lying all night chewing their cud, and they would gradually appear through the early morning mist making their way to the gate, then up the narrow lane, which had high walls that were covered with Lichen and Moss and across the stone strewn lane, a stream gurgled through the wall, then disappeared beneath a great stone .on the opposite side of the lane. One by one the cows arrived at the farm buildings. Into the farm yard they would come their udders full of milk with the odd cow or two, milk beginning to stream from their teats. The cows first of all would make their way to a trough in the farm yard, where they would take their fill of water, what was remarkable was that in this trough were several fish which lived there, we had caught these fish quite a while ago in the local canal and placed them in the trough, they would now be about Six to eight inches long, they lived quite happily in there , even when the cows had almost emptied the trough, the fish would flick about until the trough was filled again. After the cows had their fill of water, they would then go into the mistal (cow shed) where they were tied up with a chain round the kneck, their were two cows to a stall, with a passage in front running the full length of the mistal this passage was called a Fotheram, Perhaps this was originally named the Fodder them, because this is where the fodder was carried to the cattle when they were fed. Well the cows were now ready for milking, which was at that timed performed by hand, because milking machines, wher virtually unknown in the north. The cows would be fed and then milked, Mother would do the feeding, carrying the milk, letting out the cows after milking washing down the Standings, finally washing up the dairy utensils .Father would do the milking, which would take about two hours to milk all the eighteen Shorthorn cattle. I can still remember the sound of the cattle being milked, first of all thet would be fed a mixture of Brewers grain, rolled corn with Linseed cake, then father would take his milking pail and three legged stool, he would place the three legged stool on the floor with the single leg at the rear so as when the cow moved about he was able to rock side ways.

A farmers Lad 2

My father would then sit with the milking pail between his legs, and the sound and rhythm of the milk going into the empty pail was like music to me, and as the pail began to fill up the sound went from a high note to a lower softer note, and a through would build up on the milk, which some times when the pail was full the through would be inches above the pail rim with out any milk running down the pail. Many is the time I would take a pint pot and let my father fill it by milking the warm milk straight into the pot, then I would drink this while still warm, this I enjoyed, and I loved the smell of fresh milk. After milking the cows were returned to the field down the same old lane. We would all go into Breakfast, which would consist of cornflakes, followed by Ham and Eggs also fried bread. After Breakfast the horses would be fetched from the field, and given a feed of Bran and Oats, after they had eaten they would have their harness; they would then be taken to the field and hitched to the grass cutter.

SEE HAYTIME IN THIS BLOG.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.